Training question for Tinman (Old Board)

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Ron
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Training question for Tinman (Old Board)

Post by Ron » Mon Feb 05, 2007 3:04 pm

Thanks to "steffo" for some old posts from both our old board and from the old run-insight.com board.
Just_Run

Registered: 11/18/05
Posts: 6 3/28/06 at 08:45 PM

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Tinman,

We are two runners taking part in a series of road races. Basically our competitive season is from May 20th to mid-October. That is a good half year of solid training. What we are wondering is any good suggestions on staying in shape that long, and also mentally, not burning out. We have experience with workouts, and a nice base since we have been running at least 6 days a week since early January. We just were hopefully looking for some advice on how to properly time some workouts to maximize the potential under such a long season. Our season consists of about 5-5k and 3 10 k with a 4 mile thrown in there as well. Any suggestions would be helpful, and thank you in advance.


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Just Run

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Tinman

Registered: 7/23/04
Posts: 1,106 3/28/06 at 11:12 PM

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Glad to help!

The following is included in my first book ("Marathon Training by Tinman"):

"To race for several weeks effectively, it is important that you do the following:

1) Build a solid aerobic base prior to the racing season. Reaching a level of solid weekly mileage is very important. A novice distance runner should run 30-45 minutes per day x 4 per week and include a weekend long run of 70-90 minutes. An elite distance runner, on the other end of the spectrum, should average of 90 minutes per day and do a weekly long run of 2 hours. In between the two is everyone else.

One key is to focus on consistency. If you can run 100 miles per week for only two weeks before exhaustion slows you down, then consider this your maximum short-term limit. Using my '70/80' rule of training you should run 70-80 miles per week consistently.

I recommend that you do 8-12 weeks of base training prior to racing. It is important that you do not use another person's training plan, by the way. The volume you can handle well may be more or less than another person's. Be realistic!

2) Retain mileage during the racing season. If you drop it you will lose aerobic endurance after about 4-6 weeks, normally. This means you'll suffer greatly in races, being unable to hold a strong pace throughout the event. As you lose aerobic endurance, you'll experience lactic acid fatigue earlier in races: You will suffer longer and wonder what is going wrong. By retaining aerobic volume, you'll avoid such early and unbearable fatigue, and your race results will be solid and consistent.

3) Use weekly Tempo Runs - at my tempo pace, not a fast tempo pace. This will ensure you retain stamina, the capacity to run at a relatively high percentage of your aerobic power. Tempo training is one key to making sure that your aerobic capacity stays high and your ability to hold a solid pace in races is retained or upgraded during the racing season. It is important that you avoid the trap of thinking that faster training is better training. Better training is better training!

4) Whenever you experience persistent fatigue, reduce or eliminate extended fast intervals, fartleks, or hill repeats until you are feeling strong again. Most runners make the mistake of reducing mileage when they are tired, thinking this will help them 'rest.' The result of dropping mileage while retaining high intensity training is further loss of aerobic endurance capacity. If this happens, you will suffer earlier in races. It won't be a pretty situation!

*If you do reduce mileage in order to recover strength, it is important that you also drop the volume of high intensity training you are using. This is the opposite method of what is proposed by people who think that high intensity is the be-all, end-all.

5) Be sure to eat and sleep well. This means getting 8-10 hours of sleep per night (every night) and taking cat-naps whenever you need a pick-me-up. This means eating quality foods, not overdoing consumption of saturated fats, protein, simple sugars, and junk food, in general. This also means you need to consume carbs with a small amount of digestible protein right away after finishing your training runs. The first 30 minutes after training is the most important. In that time frame you should consume fluids and calories that are good for you if you want to recover quickly.

6) Take 'down time' every 5 or 6 weeks. That is, you should do no racing and no 'hard' workouts that week; just easy distance running and strider's. This will allow your body and mind a chance to regain vitality and hunger for racing and training. A break from competition and hard training is good for a runner on occasion."

The above is NOT to be used for publication by others.

I hope this helps you.

Sincerely,

Tinman


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Optimal Training beats Hard training 9 out of 10 times.

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Just_Run

Registered: 11/18/05
Posts: 6 3/28/06 at 11:24 PM

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Tinman,

On behalf of my friend and myself, I would like to express our gratitude not only for your quick, and extensive reply to our question, but for all that you do. Just so I am making sure we are right, we do not plan on a lifting program until early June. We have a good idea what to do with that, solid reps and eventually percentages based off of our earlier work.I just wanted to make sure June is an ideal time. I thank you for your help and wish you luck in all that you do. I assure you, " the above will not be used for publication by others", I greatly appreciate your help.

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Just Run

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riorun

Registered: 10/18/04
Posts: 21 3/29/06 at 08:25 AM

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Tinman:
Do you keep the same mileage on the Down Time week?

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Tinman

Registered: 7/23/04
Posts: 1,106 3/29/06 at 03:11 PM

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Regarding the Down Week:

If you use an Easy to Moderate Pace during the whole week, you can run the same volume as you normally do yet still recover and feel strong. If you run faster than an EM, than you will need to drop mileage a bit, perhaps 10-20%, depending. There is a caveat. If you are running somewhat low mileage, already, then dropping mileage to recover is not a good idea. It is better to just slow down the pace, overall, and keep the same mileage. I have said this before on run-insight.com: I have recommended the cut-off point should be 40 miles for females and 50 miles for males. If you dip below it, you lose quite a bit of endurance rather quickly. Regards, Tinman


__________________
Optimal Training beats Hard training 9 out of 10 times.
-Ron
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