A Good Read - Wetmore.

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BURN7
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A Good Read - Wetmore.

Post by BURN7 » Wed Oct 01, 2014 9:12 am


Tinman
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Re: A Good Read - Wetmore.

Post by Tinman » Wed Oct 01, 2014 10:59 am

The article mentions Ed Mather, who was Wetmore's Bernard High School coach. I knew about Mather back in the 1980s. In my view, he's the main reason for Wetmore's success. Had Mather not been the high school coach of Wetmore, nobody ever would have heard or Wetmore. Mather was as good as any coach in America. He pressed the importance of mileage and long runs to build endurance. Many great high school runners were developed in Bernards due to Mather. His kids were running at 80 plus miles per week, not too much intensity, and really developing aerobic fitness to a high level. His teams were very deep too! His 8-15th boys in some years could win the New Jersey state championship meet.

Here is a good article too:

http://heartworksofbville.blogspot.com/
Last edited by Tinman on Wed Oct 01, 2014 11:35 am, edited 1 time in total.
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dilluh
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Re: A Good Read - Wetmore.

Post by dilluh » Wed Oct 01, 2014 11:24 am

I saw this article as well. I like that Wetmore, while holding to his principles of training (high aerobic endurance fitness), is constantly making small tweaks to his approach as he looks at the mountains of notes from previous years. He seems to have a knack for getting his teams to peak at the right time. Perhaps this is a function of emphasis on aerobic and stamina development early/mid season and only putting a fine edge on things when it really matters, i.e., Nationals. I've also liked the idea that most every runner needs to maintain a long run in their schedule, even if it is just a very easy one. It doesn't matter if you're a miler or a marathoner, if it's early season or in season. I think Tinman is a proponent of this philosophy (correct me if I'm wrong) and Wetmore certainly appears to believe in it, too.

Tinman
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Re: A Good Read - Wetmore.

Post by Tinman » Wed Oct 01, 2014 11:45 am

I can't speak for Wetmore, but I think he and I can thank Arthur Lydiard for our belief in the long run and aerobic development through mileage. Collegiately and post-collegiately, my first coach, Mr. Mick, used three different training methods in the 1960s: Lydiard's, Igloi's, and Bowerman's. He also ran under the Stampfl method in high school. Mr. Mick shared with me that each method had it's pros and cons. Mr. Mick extracted the best from each method and applied it in his coaching of middle school runners in our small town. In the late 1960s to the early 1970s, he coached at a small high school and produced some solid 2-mile runners in IL (several in the 9:20-40 range, actually, one one ran 9:08 (a full 2 miles). It's too bad Mr. Mick didn't coach me in high school, for I am sure my performances would have been far better. My high school track training was a mere 20-25 miles per week. My senior year I added 2-3 extra distance runs to get it to 40 per week the last month, and that dramatically improved my performance.

Oddly,  in the summer, while running 45 miles per week the previous summer to my senior year, I could run 5 x 1 mile in 5:25 with a 90 second jog recovery, and it was a hilly gravel road course. It felt like 5 mile race-pace to me. That summer I was doing a long run each week and a "threshold" tempo run on 3, building to 6, miles over a month period of time. I ran no speed, no fartlek, no "hard" workouts prior to that 5 x 1 mile workout. My tempo runs were basically about 15k - 10 mile pace, if I had to guess - so solid by not gut busters. 

My point is that distance running, especially long runs and tempos on hilly terrain, are golden. I've learned that those were components of the Lydiard method. I've learned that Wetmore, who learned from Coach Mather and Arthur Lydiard, centers his training on this single, unified concept. Everything else supports the aerobic foundation. My use of "stamina" training is an expansion of the concept of solid tempo running. I've made it inclusive, specific, and individualized. The concept is basic in theory. I believe that if you are fit enough to run a good 10k race, you can fine tune training for every other event from the 1500m to the ultramarathon. And,I even think that an 800m runner who is able to run a faster 10k race too will be able to run a faster 800m race, once specialized training has been executed for a few weeks.

It takes a really good understanding about how to optimize the processes involved, though, which takes years of observing how runners react/respond to training schedules. It is an art, and it's not easy to master. It's a challenge, but that's the joy of being a coach!
Last edited by Tinman on Wed Oct 01, 2014 12:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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dilluh
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Re: A Good Read - Wetmore.

Post by dilluh » Wed Oct 01, 2014 6:27 pm

Obviously I am a big proponent of your methods so I ask this out of curiosity, not trying to challenge you. Why is the 10k such a critical race distance/pace for translational running ability from 1500m-ultramarathon? Is there a specific physiological response gained at this pace that overlaps well with all those other distances or is it that 10k pace hits a well rounded amount of several physiological responses? Or is it just that 10k pace is highly efficient stamina training (bang for your buck, so to speak)?

This kind of stuff is gold - you need to write your book! =]

dkggpeters
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Re: A Good Read - Wetmore.

Post by dkggpeters » Thu Oct 02, 2014 9:10 am

[quote="dilluh"]
Obviously I am a big proponent of your methods so I ask this out of curiosity, not trying to challenge you. Why is the 10k such a critical race distance/pace for translational running ability from 1500m-ultramarathon? Is there a specific physiological response gained at this pace that overlaps well with all those other distances or is it that 10k pace hits a well rounded amount of several physiological responses? Or is it just that 10k pace is highly efficient stamina training (bang for your buck, so to speak)?

This kind of stuff is gold - you need to write your book! =]
[/quote]

http://www.championshipproductions.com/ ... rticle.pdf

dilluh
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Re: A Good Read - Wetmore.

Post by dilluh » Thu Oct 02, 2014 11:21 am

thanks!

Schebo
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Re: A Good Read - Wetmore.

Post by Schebo » Thu Oct 02, 2014 2:28 pm

[quote="dilluh"]
Obviously I am a big proponent of your methods so I ask this out of curiosity, not trying to challenge you. Why is the 10k such a critical race distance/pace for translational running ability from 1500m-ultramarathon? Is there a specific physiological response gained at this pace that overlaps well with all those other distances or is it that 10k pace hits a well rounded amount of several physiological responses? Or is it just that 10k pace is highly efficient stamina training (bang for your buck, so to speak)?

This kind of stuff is gold - you need to write your book! =]
[/quote]
I´ve said it before: running repeats at around 10k pace with shortish active rest has been known for decades to be a very effective training tool. A have a book on running training written in the 1980s that advocates just that training approach.

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