Newborns and Running

Featuring TheRunZone?s resident coach Tinman. All participants are welcome to post and reply to topics in this section whether you?re looking for advice, or sharing your own coaching experience.

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Tinman
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Re: Newborns and Running

Post by Tinman » Thu Jan 08, 2015 9:43 pm

I assume the following is the question to which you refer:

Tom - if 5-6 x 1000m CV reps and 30 minute Tinman Tempos are the norm today and I break them apart because of expected fatigue as you have suggested, will my fitness be retained? To take it another step, can performance improment still occur with the modified workouts? I'm reading your example to indicate I should do 20 - 24 x 1 min CV reps an 4 - 5 x 1 mile at Tinman Tempo as a substitute- right?

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Let's say you normally run 6 x 4 minutes at CV with a 84 second jog recovery, and later you want to run 24 x 1 minute @ CV pace. The volume is the same. The recovery is 35% for the 4 minute reps, and if use the same percentage for the 1 minute reps the recovery would have to be 21seconds. The second workout will be fairly similar in stress level, and you will probably be able to hold fitness for a month at that level. After that, you might have to run the last 3-4 reps of 1 minute faster in order to sustain fitness.

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Schebo
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Re: Newborns and Running

Post by Schebo » Fri Jan 09, 2015 12:52 pm

Josh_1 wrote:I'm going to bump this thread back to the top for Tinman to answer my last question.

Another thing I've considered is implementing a 3-day Tinman rotation and bringing my mileage down a little bit. I'm mostly concerned about how to fit-in running with a long commute, long work hours, and a new baby. I guess it would probably be most helpful to have sort of a guide to follow after a restless night.

For example, if I plan to wake up at 5am to run (because that is the only time I'd have to do it) and I was supposed to run a workout; however, I woke up every two hours and only got three hours of sleep that night, is there any rule of thumb I should use so as not to dig myself into a hole?

This is just an example, but:

0-2 hours of sleep = no more than 30 min easy running
2-5 hours of sleep = reduced workout
> 5 hours of sleep = standard workout as planned

It is just hard to know how to adjust a planned workout when you wake up from a sleepless night at 5am to run - the only time you have. I can always quit running, but I would like to keep it if I can!!

Thanks!
Occasional nights with very little or no sleep doesn´t do anything to your physical capacity. The last two years of my "elite" career I worked night shifts and once I drove directly from a night at work to a road relay and I won the first leg in a time that was the fastest I ran that year. Of course I felt like complete crap when I got home and it would not have been possible to do it again the day after.
When we got kids we arranged it so that my wife slept with the kids when I had planned a workout the day after. If she had a workout I slept with them etc.

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Re: Newborns and Running

Post by infini » Mon Jan 19, 2015 3:27 am

Schebo wrote:Occasional nights with very little or no sleep doesn´t do anything to your physical capacity. The last two years of my "elite" career I worked night shifts and once I drove directly from a night at work to a road relay and I won the first leg in a time that was the fastest I ran that year. Of course I felt like complete crap when I got home and it would not have been possible to do it again the day after.
When we got kids we arranged it so that my wife slept with the kids when I had planned a workout the day after. If she had a workout I slept with them etc.
Hi. I would like to add my thoughts: this seems like an individual thing. I only train if I did at least 6+ hours sleep unless it's an easy run because I find that's what works for me. I tried the no sleep & race "method" too and I performed awfully. I don't really recommend it. Congrats to you though ;D

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Re: Newborns and Running

Post by Josh_1 » Sun Jan 25, 2015 3:15 pm

Thanks for the explanation, Tom! I'm also considering your 3-day rotation for a while - just to see if that density could do the trick for me.

The (lack of) sleep thing has me most concerned. I have no doubt that I can squeeze in a run, but feeling like running is where I'm probably going to have the hardest time.

Dilluh - you're getting close to your date! Are you planning to take a little break from running for a few weeks and see how it goes or just charge forth and see where you can fit it in? I'll be in your shoes a month from now!

Best of luck and congrats!!!

Josh

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Re: Newborns and Running

Post by Tinman » Mon Jan 26, 2015 12:46 am

Josh,

It's tough getting used to the role of being a parent of a infant, for sure. I think the big thing is to be very consistent with the time that you train. I coach several people who run early in the morning because it's the best time for them to get in their run before mom and child are awake. I think it's better to set aside 45 minutes to an hour at say 6 a.m. and get it done, period. Your wife will adjust to a consistent schedule, but it will stress her out if you vary when you run. Get up get going and get 'er done!

I think being organized is super important for people who are short on time and energy. For example, set your clothes out next to your bed, shoes too, if possible, so that when you get up - at say 5:55 a.m., you dress in 2-3 minutes, use the bathroom, drink your pre-mixed sports drink in the refrigerator, and get out the door in a total of 6-7 minutes. Run for 40-45 minutes, jump in the shower, and dress (have your clothes for the day already set out the night before, and shoes too, along with any work related items you need). Think, "I have one total hour, be efficient, be prepared. I can do it!"

Best of luck,

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FTIR
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Re: Newborns and Running

Post by FTIR » Mon Jan 26, 2015 10:48 am

Josh,
Tinman's getting it done plan is gold. To take it one step further, carve out a similar hour for your wife. She may or may not be up to or interested in exercise but she will appreciate an hour of time that she completely controls for her own needs.

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Re: Newborns and Running

Post by dilluh » Mon Jan 26, 2015 2:14 pm

We are getting close - 3 weeks from today, actually. Tinman’s suggestions are good ones I think and I’ve been transitioning my running into efficiency mode as we approach. Fortunately my wife understands running’s importance to my health (physical but maybe even moreso, mental/emotional) and has never once suggested I stop running once baby arrives. Right now my schedule is: Get up, have running stuff laid out ready to go, hit the bathroom, take a quick couple of swigs of fruit juice and out the door. All that typically takes around 10 minutes. My wife knows my running schedule now and it’s even easier since I recently switched back to time-based running rather than distance. She knows I will be back in 60 min or less on M, Tu, Th and F. On Wednesday I do a big workout 80-90 min and the Saturday LR/big workout is 90-100 min. I don’t run on Sunday’s. I plan on sticking to this the best I possibly can. The biggest thing is to just get out the door and start moving my feet as soon as I can. No matter how tired (even before baby, there is a bit of sleep deprivation as my wife is not sleeping very well right now and then I don’t sleep well either), or dark out or cold out. I’m outside now - just go, don’t dawdle around in the house. Also, I know that if I don’t get the run in at that early hour of the day - there is no other chance to run the rest of the day.

I’ve always believed that relationships are sacrifices in many ways but I also believe that to be a good partner or a parent you also have to still maintain some time/identity of yourself. This is in line with FTIR’s suggestion to give that hour back to your wife for her to be her instead of just mom. I absolutely plan on doing this as well. I am fortunate to have a mother-in-law that I get along with very well. She will be with us for approximately the first 2 weeks after the baby is born and then my mother will be here for a week after that. Both have vowed to help us with this transition in whatever way possible so I feel very fortunate to have that support.

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