Marathon Training in Summer

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Barney
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Marathon Training in Summer

Post by Barney » Thu May 26, 2016 7:56 pm

All, I'm looking for advice regarding training for a marathon (in the South) over the summer. I know, not the brightest idea, but I've found a last chance qualifier on 09/10. I've BQed a number of times before and ran Boston in 2015. I thought the "been there - done that" attitude was enough and I wouldn't want to go back. My wife qualified again and wants to go. That is the reason for the last minute attempt. I struggle with the heat and was wondering if anyone had any tricks in doing long runs in the heat. I've tried running early in the morning, but the morning humidity is almost worse that 95F temps. I read that Tinman sometimes recommends breaking up long runs in two separate runs and wondered if anyone had success. Thanks for any help.

Mike

dilluh
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Re: Marathon Training in Summer

Post by dilluh » Fri May 27, 2016 11:34 am

I'm in central TX and two years ago trained through the summer for a fall marathon so I know where you are coming from. If you aren't a great heat runner (I am not) - it isn't pleasant, no matter how you plan your runs. One strategy that can be helpful for the long run is to cover about 3/4 of the distance, stop, get some water and try to walk around in some shade for ~10 minutes and then go out and finish the last 1/4 of the distance.

It really depends on what kind of time you are shooting for in training but a huge part of marathon training is just getting that time on your feet in one effort - getting acclimated to the pounding. That small break isn't going to change that goal/stimulus much. I think there is value in doing full long runs without stopping but it doesn't have to be every single long run in the training cycle. Again, the caveat here is what you are after, goal-wise.

If you haven't already, I would look into Tinman's "big two" workout schedule for the marathon buildup. I found that by limiting the total amount of days per week dedicated to any long+"fast" running to two, recovery was ensured.

And to some extent, it's just going to suck sometimes. I definitely found myself having to dig fairly deep for mental fortitude on a few occasions to finish out a long run that had 4-6 miles at MP at the end while the temps started to soar. Mental fortitude (stick-to-it-iveness as I like to think of it) is good brain training for the marathon.

Barney
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Re: Marathon Training in Summer

Post by Barney » Fri May 27, 2016 8:52 pm

Thanks for the post. I will try that. I have a flexible schedule and may schedule long runs around any cold fronts that move in :D . The treadmill may become a good friend and I may split long runs (1/2 on roads and 1/2 on treadmill). Thanks again.

shug
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Re: Marathon Training in Summer

Post by shug » Sat May 28, 2016 3:26 pm

dilluh wrote: And to some extent, it's just going to suck sometimes. I definitely found myself having to dig fairly deep for mental fortitude on a few occasions to finish out a long run that had 4-6 miles at MP at the end while the temps started to soar. Mental fortitude (stick-to-it-iveness as I like to think of it) is good brain training for the marathon.
You shouldn't have to dig much "deeper" while training in heat than in ideal conditions. There is no reason for it. Sure it may be less comfortable, but there is no need to strain to force your training log to look a certain way.

Just because your goal pace is X, does not mean that you need to do your quality miles at that exact pace. People (and I have been guilty) get far too hung-up on pace during training.

I would advise against training by pace and let effort and conditions dictate your pace. Better yet, use a HRM and let that keep you honest. I like using the HRM for certain workouts simply as a top end governor rather than let it determine my pace. I did this when I lived in the desert and it worked very well.

The other benefit of using the HRM during hot conditions is you WILL know when it's time to throw in the towel. When your HR won't go down even when you slow way down, you know your dehydrated and going too much further will do more harm than good.

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