Racing flats=sore calves?

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runkona
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Racing flats=sore calves?

Post by runkona » Tue Aug 21, 2012 5:32 pm

has any one else had similar soreness. I'm using Acias Pirnaha's for 4-5 mths for mainly 5k-10k-15k racing or speed sessions and use regular training shoes for other sessions. I know i heel strike, but have been working on better foot planting.

Perhaps I lose foot form when running a PR race 10k-15k's and suffer as a  result. Just an observations. It does seem to hapen with races only. Oh and I do calves raises in my gym sessions with taxing them too much.
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Jim
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Re: Racing flats=sore calves?

Post by Jim » Tue Aug 21, 2012 7:25 pm

The Asics Pirahna's are pretty minimalist racing flats.  I have a pair of Hyperspeeds, and even as a heavier runner of 176lbs, I find them pretty cushy for racing 5km to 10km.  But I also got some calf pain in the summer when I started track training and racing in spikes.  Some heel raises and stretching seemed to help.  You might opt for a beefier shoe until your stride and footplant become more efficient.

jeff overmyer

Re: Racing flats=sore calves?

Post by jeff overmyer » Tue Oct 02, 2012 10:36 am

Jump rope.  If you are only getting the soreness after speed work outs and races it just means your calves are the weak link or your body.  The calve raises do not mimic the quick springing action of racing which jumping rope does.  Don't go overboad all at once... 5 maybe 10 min after any run except hard fast days.  My son and his teammates go through this at the beginning of every  racing season and this is the cure.
As with any training this won't fix it right away, but it actually woks pretty quick.

Good Luck

dkggpeters
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Re: Racing flats=sore calves?

Post by dkggpeters » Tue Oct 02, 2012 2:43 pm

I think the soreness comes more from the lower heel to toe drop thereby causing your calves to stretch more then they are used to.

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Re: Racing flats=sore calves?

Post by Ron » Thu Oct 04, 2012 7:23 am

Running barefoot in the grass as a cool down is a great stimulus to the calves. After a track workout I always take my shoes off and run a mile or two in the infield as a cool down.
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rycase

Re: Racing flats=sore calves?

Post by rycase » Sat Oct 06, 2012 11:20 am

[quote="dkggpeters"]
I think the soreness comes more from the lower heel to toe drop thereby causing your calves to stretch more then they are used to.
[/quote]

+1 - I am a strong believer in this. The heel-toe combo in addition to the lighter weight causes a different gait in conjunction with a higher amount of road feedback.

The piranha's are a fairly light flat (At this time the third lightest production road flat behind the Wave Universe and the NB MRC5000) . They have a 5mm heel toe drop which is certainly not pancake flat, however most likely less than you are used to in your daily trainers.

I find that hill bounding, A-Skips, B-Skips and Hill Sprints all will assist in reducing your soreness with these. I run a similar shoe if half marathons.

J2R

Re: Racing flats=sore calves?

Post by J2R » Sat Oct 06, 2012 12:32 pm

I would say it's just a transitional thing and not something to worry about, as long as you don't go at it too hard and cause achilles tears, for example. I've moved pretty much into the minimalist camp in the last 3-4 years, and everyone who does so goes through that phase of sore calves for a while. Because your heel is lower, you're stretching your calf more. I do all my running - training and racing - in shoes which are pretty much flat, or with very little heel-toe drop.

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