Tinman's Training: 10-16 March 2014

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Tinman
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Tinman's Training: 10-16 March 2014

Post by Tinman » Sun Mar 16, 2014 3:38 pm

Mon: 30' easy: 269 watts average, 524 Calories burned. 9.44 miles covered @ 1% grade.

Tue: 25'2" at tempo effort (no warm up, too short on time!). 359 Watts average, 558 Calories burned.7.2 miles covered at 3% grade.

Wed: 15' easy to easy-moderate warm up @ 295 watts average., 283 Calories burned. 3.4 miles @ 4% grade. Felt great! Another 15' @ 297 watts average. Burned  284 Calories (kilocalories). 3.44 miles @ 4% grade.  Total was 30' today. Total Calories burned was 567. Kilojoules applied was 531.

Thu: 20' (short on time) @ 306 watts average. 389 Calories burned. 5.2 miles covered @ 3% grade. Felt like 65-70% effort. Today is my birthday (age 47). Felt strong, and I was hoping to ride later in the day and do something challenging, but with soccer practice for my son, and so on, I simply had no time. I try to reserve time after 5 pm for family.

Fri: My family is sick (respiratory illness). My wife's been coughing for a week and yesterday my son (age 6) started coughing big-time and he was warm (temperature about 99.6). We debated about whether to take him to soccer practice, or not, and went ahead. It was a mistake! He simply felt awful and he ended up sitting down with me for 3/4ths of the practice, coughing, dealing with congestion, etc.  Today, he stayed home from school (he attends 3 hours each morning, normally, as a kindergarten student, but he had a 100.5 fever, was sweating like crazy, and coughing a lot. He felt awful! I comforted him most of the day. I still got to ride in the evening, which usually doesn'thappen. My wife doesn't have to stay late after school on Fridays (she normally works for the after-school program at the school for 2-3 hours after school is out). I rode 1 hour today on the bike. I felt awful for 25 minutes (achy muscles, low energy, and so on, so I thought I might be getting the same sickness as my family. I decided to keep the intensity low and just see how my body feels. I meant to go half an hour, but around the 25 minute mark my body felt better all of a sudden. I'm not saying that I feel great, just better. I continued cycling and thought that I'd just evaluate my status every 5 minutes. I continued to feel better and better, so by 45 minutes I was convinced that I was not going to be sick; the achy muscles and overall fatigue or lack of energy was due to lack of sleep last night. My family was sick, up half the night coughing, etc., and so I basically got just 2-3 hours of sleep. However, the easy aerobic ride I was doing at 5 pm today was making my body come alive, after 25 minutes. I rode a full hour. Average wattage was 283 and Calories burned as 1,096. 16.9 miles covered @ 2% grade. For those of you reading this and unfamiliar with the impact of grade, each 1% grade can slow you down quite a bit - probably 1.5-2 miles per hour. Thus, today's 2.5% grade probably cost my 3 miles per hour or a bit more. To generally covert cycling to running, multiple by .4 and you get the running speed. For example, when I ride 20 miles per hour (which is fairly easy for me), that's the same as running 8 miles per hour (20 * .4 = 8.0). And, 8 miles per hour is equal to 7:30 per mile pace, running. (60 / 8 = 7.5). To convert to kilometers per hour, multiply 20 (miles per hour) by 1.609344. Therefore, my approximate easy cycling speed today was was 32.19. And my running equivalent is 12.875 kph (which is 4.66 minutes per kilometer or 4:40 pace per km).

Sat: 15' @ what felt like a moderate effort (not tempo), but my wattage was suprisingnly high @ 341. My heart rate was low (130s), as was my effort (felt like a 3 on a 7 scale, which is my long-time perceived effort scale range: 1 to 7). In my scale, a 4 is a tempo effort. I covered 4.2 miles @ 3% grade during my 15 minutes warm up (moderate effort) and 320 Calories, so 21.333 Calories per minute. Because I felt good, I went straight into a time-trial of 7 minutes to test my aerobic power. I started out conservatively (at my previous average wattage for 7 minutes) ! 460 watts for the first 3.5 minutes. I felt like I could hold that for 15 minutes. Then, I gradually ramped (up) the intensity. I averaged 493 watts the second 3.5 minutes of the time-trial. Really, I pushed in the 527-537 range over the last minute, and I still felt like I could have done that for a longer time, if I were in a real race. I normally try to keep time-trials int he 95-97% effort range, and I advise athletes I coach (and coaches that I coach) to do the same. I never see a reason to max-out during time-trials. I believe that 95-97% effort gives the athlete (or coach) an excellent data reference for determining fitness level. Furthermore, I think that 95-97% is far easier to recover from than a 100% (maximum) effort. Finally, I always want to have athletes know that they didn't give a maximum effort during a time-trial; that way, on race-day, they can dig deeper, knowing what it feels like to be at 95-97% effort versus 100% effort. They don't fall into the trap of confusing the two, and they push harder on race-day. Note, I only think that executing at 100% effort is necessary in really important races; not your average, everyday race, where 95-97% effort is good enough.  After I rode the 7-minute time-trial, average 477 watts (a new personal best) and burning 200 Calories (so 28.571429 Calories per minute), heart rate only hitting 164 at the 6' mark and 170 @ the 7-minutes mark, therefore not full-effort, I did a 28' cool down (endurance ride). I rode quite easy or 5 minutes (around 250 watts) and then rode in the 280s after that. I averaged 274 watts and burned 497 Calories after the time-trial.
In total, I burned 1017 Calories in 50 minutes of cycling (so an average of 20.34 Calories per minute) or my kJoules average was 1,092, which is quite solid for 50 minutes of training. My normalized power, per my calculations was 364 watts for 50 minutes. Normalized power adjusts for the relationship of time and wattage (which is the rate of energy used - per second). To clarify, the 7-minutes test in the middle had an average of 477 watts, but it's relative stress (per unit-time) is even higher, compared to the warm up and cool down stress components.  I created an advanced formula that shows how much relative impact each wattage (and running speed) impacts one's body. It's very interesting to look at! I may reveal the numbers in my next book, when I have time to write it.  It really could open up some eyes about how stress relates to pace (or wattage). Very cool stuff!!!

Sun: 30 minutes easy - 273 watts. HR about 130 out of 174. Legs stiff from the hard effort yesterday.
Last edited by Tinman on Mon Mar 17, 2014 5:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Tinman's Training: 10-16 March 2014

Post by Tinman » Wed Dec 31, 2014 9:18 pm

It is not running, just cycling for me since I have two hips that need replacement (bone spurs grew from my brain tumor, and they gouged into my hip joints and ruined the cartilage). I rode 55:52 today and burned 1,000 Kilocalories. I averaged 277 watts - probably 70% of my maximum aerobic power in watts. My effort was modest - Heart Rate in the 130s, and my max is about 174. This is the longest that I have cycled since my brain surgery in August. I did no exercise for the 6 weeks post-op. Then, I eased into stationary cycling for a month. Then, I added in two weight training sessions using light resistance for a month. I'm not at 4-5 rides per week, mostly 30 minutes easy, and 1 or 2 weight training sessions per week. Last week and this week I have no school, so I am not on my feet teaching P.E. all day. Therefore, I have more energy, and that's why this week I have cycled 40, 45, and 55 minutes.
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Re: Tinman's Training: 10-16 March 2014

Post by Tinman » Tue Mar 10, 2015 12:02 am

Following brain surgery in August, I took it easy for two months, as I recovered. Starting in November, I stationary cycled 20-30 minutes per day three or four times per week at a comfortable effort. Starting in December, I did one tempo effort per week, otherwise 3 easy rides; and, I started weight training once a week. Starting in February, I added another weight training day per week, one easy, one more aggressive. Stating in March, I did a faster/harder 20 minute tempo, followed up by a test effort this past Saturday.

For the test, I rode 5 minutes @ threshold effort (so about 310-15 wattage and immediately rode 10 minutes @ CV effort about 330-335 wattage). I rested 20 seconds as I tightened my shoes and reset my number tracker. Then, I rode 8 minutes hard. The first 5 minutes felt like 90-95% effort, with wattage in the 350-363 range. The last 5 minutes felt like 97-98% effort. I did not hammer the last minute, as I would if going full effort. Hence, I rode a strong aerobic effort but didn't go to my anaerobic reserves, on purpose because I want to set my workout intensities based on my aerobic, not anaerobic, ability. My ending wattage was 374 for the 8 minute test. I figure I could have gone 390+ at 100% effort, using anaerobic reserves.

Total was 50 minutes. I've only rode that much one other time since July.
Anyway, I have a reference to use for monitoring progress. I am not training hard, but I may now start pushing it a bit more once or twice a week if my body responds positively. I'll still be careful. I figure another six months of being cautious, following surgery, is a wise strategy. Exercise is mostly for my health these days. It's my stress reliever and gives me some relaxation and energy. I feel really tired and my brain (literally) hurts when I don't exercise. I think stress gets to me, and I feel it a lot where the surgeon removed the tumor. It's an odd, surreal, feeling/sensation. Not fun, I can that for sure!
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Re: Tinman's Training: 10-16 March 2014

Post by dilluh » Tue Mar 24, 2015 5:38 pm

Congrats on the progress Tinman! That is great to hear. You practice what you preach by building with caution and not going anaerobic in workouts at early stages. Running for me now is just for fitness and stress relief as well, although I still try to do a shortened mid-week wave run and get out for ~1 hour of trail running with fartleks on the weekend. The new kiddo zaps a lot of available energy - in both good ways and bad. :)

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Re: Tinman's Training: 10-16 March 2014

Post by Tinman » Tue Mar 24, 2015 6:22 pm

Thanks Dilluh!

Being a new parent, you try to balance your fitness and running needs with family needs. All parents get that situation. As your child becomes older, even closer to age 1, you'll be able to have more time to spend with running. You child by then will sleep for longer stretches of time, and that means less stress on you and your wife.

For me, I remind myself that I enjoy exercise, enjoy being more fit than less fit, and that my goals must be shorter term and realistic. During the last 26 years as a coach, I learned from coaching that the most successful people avoided the trap biting off more than they can chew at any given moment. They set small goals, say 3-6 weeks away, and worked toward them. They keep setting small, forward goals and they chip away at the big mountain of rock before them. As each new cycle/goal passes, more and more of the big sculpture appears. Before long, the nice piece of art is produced, and that art lasts; it doesn't fall apart. In contrast, people get out a jackhammer and try to knock huge slaps off the mountain of rock tend to fail; the big rock cracks, and there is little control over the process of forming the art.

A friend and mentor, Tim, back in the 1980s, once told me that he only ran one mile at a time in a cross country race. And, note, he was three times and All-American runner in the event, which is remarkable because he had chronic Achilles tendinosis, and he could train no more than 25 miles per week. Much of his training was on a stationary bike, standing upright. Mentally, he rehearsed his races every night, in a formal style taught by the sports psychologist who worked with our team.

Tim practiced 1 mile cross-country races, basically. He ran only 1 mile in his mind. Then, he ran the next mile in his mind. He never worried about his time overall. He only focused on running 1 mile in 5:00 on grass. And, he ran 24:50 for 8km on grass at the national meet (right on the money 5 minute pace per mile), earning a top-25 spot. One year, Tim ran an average of 6 miles per week on land in training. He biked 1 hour per day. More important was his use of mental imagery, concentration of taking care of just small, controllable segments of each race, and his complete lack of worry about competition. He never, ever thought one moment about any other runner. He feared nobody, therefore. He ran his races as if in his dream of mental practice of so many previous days. He saw success, his success was guaranteed because he was the master of the moment. He truly was my hero in terms of mental strategy, practice, and utility. I admire Tim to this day.

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Re: Tinman's Training: 10-16 March 2014

Post by dilluh » Tue Mar 24, 2015 8:08 pm

Tinman wrote: For me, I remind myself that I enjoy exercise, enjoy being more fit than less fit, and that my goals must be shorter term and realistic. Tinman
I keep this in mind all the time now. I know that I'll be able to run more at some point in the future - it's perfectly ok that I'm nowhere near race fit currently. The best thing I can do now is just run for mental and physical health. Keep at least a low level of running fitness going (keeping the ball rolling, in a way I suppose) so that when that time comes around I'm not starting from zero.
Tinman wrote: A friend and mentor, Tim, back in the 1980s, once told me that he only ran one mile at a time in a cross country race. And, note, he was three times and All-American runner in the event, which is remarkable because he had chronic Achilles tendinosis, and he could train no more than 25 miles per week. Much of his training was on a stationary bike, standing upright. Mentally, he rehearsed his races every night, in a formal style taught by the sports psychologist who worked with our team.

Tim practiced 1 mile cross-country races, basically. He ran only 1 mile in his mind. Then, he ran the next mile in his mind. He never worried about his time overall. He only focused on running 1 mile in 5:00 on grass. And, he ran 24:50 for 8km on grass at the national meet (right on the money 5 minute pace per mile), earning a top-25 spot. One year, Tim ran an average of 6 miles per week on land in training. He biked 1 hour per day. More important was his use of mental imagery, concentration of taking care of just small, controllable segments of each race, and his complete lack of worry about competition. He never, ever thought one moment about any other runner. He feared nobody, therefore. He ran his races as if in his dream of mental practice of so many previous days. He saw success, his success was guaranteed because he was the master of the moment. He truly was my hero in terms of mental strategy, practice, and utility. I admire Tim to this day.
Tinman
What a great story!

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